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  1. page Yehud edited ... Further reading Carter, Charles E. The Emergence of Yehud in the Persian Period: A Social and…
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    Further reading
    Carter, Charles E. The Emergence of Yehud in the Persian Period: A Social and Demographic Study. Journal for the Study of the Old Testament Supplement Series 294. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1999.
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    New York: T & TT&T Clark International,
    Stern, Ephraim. The Assyrian, Babylonian and Persian Periods, 732-332 BCE. Vol. 2 of The Archaeology of the Land of the Bible. New Haven; London: Yale University Press, 2009.
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    6:58 am
  2. page Wisdom of Solomon edited ... The text of Wisdom is repeatedly quoted by the early Christian fathers and later writers, most…
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    The text of Wisdom is repeatedly quoted by the early Christian fathers and later writers, mostly as inspired. The Council of Trent (1546) granted canonical status to it and Roman Catholic liturgy makes full use of it. The first nine chapters especially contain many intellectual and spiritual rewards to the contemporary God-seeking mind. Its sections concerned with idol worship (chapters 12 – 15), in convergence with other similar passages from the Hebrew Bible, recently attracted the interest of modern Hebrew Bible scholarship.
    FURTHER READINGFurther reading
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    CBCEB. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,
    Geyer, John. The Wisdom of Solomon: Introduction and Commentary. Torch Bible Commentaries 27. London: SCM Press, 1963.
    Hadas, M. “Wisdom of Solomon.” Pages 861-63 in vol. 4 of The Interpreter's Dictionary of the Bible. 4 vols. Edited by George A. Buttrick. New York: Abingdon, 1962.
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    6:36 am

Wednesday, September 20

  1. page Temple edited ... Further reading Haran, Menahem. Temples and Temple Service in Ancient Israel. Winona Lake, IN…
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    Further reading
    Haran, Menahem. Temples and Temple Service in Ancient Israel. Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns, 1985.
    Cogan, Mordechai. Pages 225-73 in 1 Kings:
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    Doubleday, 2001. Pages 225-73.
    Tomes, Roger. '"Our Holy and Beautiful House": When and Why was 1 Kings 6-8 Written?' Journal for the Study of the Old Testament 70 (1996): 33-50. Reprinted in Tomes, pages 59-74 in Interpreting the Text. Sheffield: Sheffield Phoenix Press, 2015.
    discussion
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    7:16 am

Monday, September 18

  1. page Song of Songs edited Ought love poetry which does not mention God to be in the Bible? Name ... Septuagint, the Vulg…
    Ought love poetry which does not mention God to be in the Bible?
    Name
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    Septuagint, the VulgateVulgate, and modern
    Contents
    The subject of the Song of Songs is love between the sexes (but see the section on Interpretation and reception history). Some scholars, such as J. Cheryl Exum, take it as a single poem dealing with the love between a single pair of lovers. Others regard it as a collection of independent love poems, since to isolate a plot in the Song is notoriously difficult. The eight chapters are bound together by the unifying theme of human love and the mutual admiration that the two lovers express. This love is hardly ever disturbed by outsiders or jealousy. Overall the Song is quite a worldly text and its eroticism is neither sanctioned nor censured by God. This may suggest a setting other than the often postulated celebration of marriage. Maybe Song of Songs can be located in the context of banquets (e.g., 2:4; 5:1b; 7:1).
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    7:18 am
  2. page Solomon edited ... He is the son of David and succeeds him as king, being the third king in Israel. He is credite…
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    He is the son of David and succeeds him as king, being the third king in Israel. He is credited, like David, with a 40-year reign (1 Kgs 11:42), but this is merely an ideal number. If his reign was historical (see below), he died around 930 to 925 BCE. The name 'Solomon' first appears in 2 Sam 5:4 in the Bible, in a list of David’s children who were born in Jerusalem. In 2 Sam 12:25 he is given the alternative name Jedidiah (beloved of YHWH). It could be that this was his personal name, and Solomon his throne name.
    Solomon’s life according to the Bible
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    2 Chronicles 1-9.1–9.
    He ascends the throne during David’s waning years after a failed coup attempt by his half-brother, Adonijah, as a result of the influence of the prophet Nathan and his mother Bathsheba on the ailing David (1 Kings 1). He then secures his power by the murder of his rival Adonijah, Adonijah's supporter Joab, and David's enemy Shimei (1 Kings 2).
    The account in Kings tells of two sides to Solomon's reign. It begins well: he is said to have been faithful to YHWH like David (1 Kgs 3:3), and when YHWH appears to him in a dream, he asks and receives the gift of wisdom (1 Kgs 3:4-15). We read of his marriage to the daughter of Pharaoh (3:1-2), the detail of his administration (4:1-19), the magnificence of his court and the strength of his army (4:22, 26-28), the prosperity and peace of Israel under his rule (4:20, 25), his domination of the surrounding kingdoms (4:21, 24), and the fame of his wisdom (4:29-34; see also 10:1-10). His principal achievement, the building of the Temple in Jerusalem, along with his own palace, is central to the account (1 Kings 5–8). It is said to have been achieved with the assistance of Hiram, king of Tyre (ch. 5), and a vast levy of forced labour: conflicting texts say that the labour was recruited from 'all Israel' (5:13; see also 12:1-19) or from the remaining Canaanites only (9:20-23).
    In 1 Kings 11 (prepared for in 9:1-9), we see the reverse side. Solomon is here said to have been led astray by his many wives and concubines, through whom he is led into idolatry. YHWH responds by raising up enemies to him, both in the subject kingdoms and at home, which after his death leads to the breakup of the kingdom. He is succeeded by his son, Rehoboam, who loses most of Israel (1 Kings 12).
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    2 Chronicles 1-91–9 reproduces most
    The historicity of Solomon
    Analysis of the account in Kings
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    Some scholars have drawn the conclusion that the kingdom of David and Solomon is entirely legendary, or even an invention of Judaean scribes after the fall of the (northern) kingdom of Israel, attempting to claim the heritage of Israel for Judah. Others would not go so far, suggesting that these kings could have existed, even if their reigns were neither as long nor as geographically extensive as the Bible suggests.
    Solomon in the rest of the Bible
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    1 Kgs 2:3–4;2:3-4; 1 Chr 22:9–13; 28:5–10).22:9-13; 28:5-10). Solomon's devotion
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    10: 26, 28),or28), or wives (11:1-8)
    Other texts associated with Solomon
    A number of non-biblical texts are associated or attributed to Solomon. The Wisdom of Solomon, an exhortatory composition written in Greek, is dated to 2nd century BCE. Two other poetic works include the Odes to Solomon (ca. 1st to 3rd century CE) and the Psalms of Solomon (ca. 1st or 2nd century BCE).
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    7:05 am

Friday, September 15

  1. page Septuagint edited ... Some of the other books followed the same translation practices of the Pentateuch translators,…
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    Some of the other books followed the same translation practices of the Pentateuch translators, while others perfected it in one of two ways. Certain books (most notably Proverbs and Job) show a greater freedom in rendering of the word order to conform to Greek idiom and choose a wider range of vocabulary, some of it from literary Greek. Other books (such as Psalms) aim at greater consistency of translation equivalents, and in their adherence to the Hebrew idioms and to word order. Many of these can be grouped by their strict adherence to the Hebrew (such as Lamentations, Song of Songs) and some appear to be further developments of this strict method (Ecclesiastes). This group of translations may be a later tradition in translation, reflecting consideration of the translation method and a concern for precise representation of the Hebrew text behind the Greek. These therefore may derive from the 1st centuries BCE or CE, and in some cases could have been produced in Palestine where the concern for the Hebrew was uppermost.
    Language
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    some literary features toofeatures, too, so that
    As all translations, there are elements of interference from the source text, which have been called Hebraisms. For example, the idiom in Hebrew of using the verb "to add" before another verb to indicate repeated action leads to the odd use in Greek of the verb προστίθημι "to add" in an attempt to match the Hebrew idiom. Such cases are few and should not obscure the existence of the natural Greek in much of the Septuagint. On the stylistic level there are features that are more frequent than in standard Greek owing to the close following of the Hebrew, and deviation from standard Greek is confined to semantic and syntactic extension.
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    Scholarly interest in the Septuagint lies in a number of areas. It is an important source for post-classical Greek and new search tools are allowing for advanced linguistic research, It is also a witness to the Hebrew text behind the translation, as confirmed by the Hebrew text evidenced in the Dead Sea Scrolls, and to the beliefs of Jews in this period. It also serves as an important witness to the text that inspired both early Jewish writers and Christian writers.
    Further reading
    Aejmelaeus, Anneli,Anneli. “The Septuagint
    Aitken, J. K. “The Septuagint and Egyptian Translation Methods.” Pages 269-94 in XV Congress of the International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies, Munich 2013. Edited by Wolfang Kraus, M. Maiser, M. van der Meer, and Martin Maiser. Atlanta, GA: SBL Press, 2016.
    Deissmann, G. Adolf, Bibelstudien (Marburg, 1895); Deissmann, G. Adolf, Neue Bibelstudien (Marburg, 1897) = Bible Studies: Contributions Chiefly from Papyri and Inscriptions to the History of the Language, Literature and the Religion of Hellenistic Judaism and Primitive Christianity. 1901.
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    7:34 am
  2. page Saul edited The first king of Israel, Saul the son of Kish from the tribe of Benjamin, is seemingly chosen by G…
    The first king of Israel, Saul the son of Kish from the tribe of Benjamin, is seemingly chosen by God and almost
    immediately rejected by him.
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    1 Samuel 8-31.8–31.
    Destined to fail?
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    see also 10:17–19;10:17-19; ch. 12). Saul
    The first rejection (1 Samuel 13)
    In the first rejection scene, it is not altogether evident wherein Saul’s disobedience lies. When Samuel fails to arrive to offer sacrifices within the seven days he had specified (1 Samuel 10:8), Saul reluctantly makes the offering himself because his army is scattering and he fears a Philistine attack before God’s favour has been sought. One might wonder if Samuel’s failure to keep the appointment on time, followed by his arrival just as Saul finished offering the sacrifice, is simply a matter of chance.
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    7:05 am

Thursday, September 14

  1. page Minor Prophets edited ... The Prophets can be further divided into the ‘Former Prophets’, consisting of the four histori…
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    The Prophets can be further divided into the ‘Former Prophets’, consisting of the four historical books—Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings—and the ‘Latter Prophets’, comprising Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and the Twelve Minor Prophets: Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi.
    The order of the Twelve Minor Prophets
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    considerably later. In fact it is generally believed by critical scholars that none of the prophetic books reached their final form until the Persian period, in the 5th or possibly the 4th century BCE. They may each contain material from the time of the prophet whose name it bears. An exception is the book of Jonah, which is a story written probably about the 4th century about the prophet mentioned in 2 Kings 14:25.
    Hosea (ca. 750‒715)
    Joel (ca. 500?)
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    9:27 am

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